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Thread: The Kendrick Lamar Thread: Mr. Morale is Back

  1. #141
    Administrator VV's Avatar
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    GKMC is Kendrick grappling with the city and community he loves and its many ails: gang violence, chronic alcoholism, and economic devastation -- and how it has shaped Compton's people, its families, and a young Kendrick maturing into adulthood.
    TPAB is Kendrick exploring his place as a black person in America, engaging in the numerous ways society has failed his people -- and often, pointing the finger directly at himself - while celebrating the richness of talent and culture brought out by the struggle.
    DAMN is Kendrick defining who he is as a spiritual being and the conflicts with the soul that comes with all things he is - black, Compton, hip-hop, famous, Kendrick -- in an epic narrative of wickedness, weakness, and redemption of the soul.

    At the start of Mother I Sober, he raps, "I'm sensitive, I feel everything, I feel everybody // One man standin' on two words, heal everybody." The Kendrick in MMBS is the Kendrick that was hardened by the devastating condition of the city he portrayed on GKMC, that was placed on a pedestal as a central figure of black America in TPAB, that mourned for the damnation of his own soul in DAMN -- finally processing everything that's happened after a lifetime of blame, guilt, trauma, expectation, ignorance, anxiety, and shame. The level of introspection shown here isn't just revealing personal details or describing a story from the past, it's examining what all that did to you.

    When I first listened to this album, I was struck by how "domestic" it is, for lack of a better word. It departs from the huge worlds he covered in his previous records - an entire city, an entire country, an entire religion - and takes us firmly into his home. His relationships with his wife, children, family, friends, and himself -- the ways he's failed them and the ways they've failed him. Kendrick ruminates on fatherhood, what it means to be a good parent, son, partner, friend, ally, cousin, and nephew, and what it means to show kindness to yourself. This is Kendrick as a man, baring his life down to the bone with extraordinary empathy and understanding of the self. It's an album only he can make, yet it feels more universal than anything he's made before.

    A masterpiece.


    CAN YOU MEET ME MORE THAN HALFWAY UP

  2. #142
    I’ll spit my truth, and it’s brown. CrownOnTheGround's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VV View Post
    GKMC is Kendrick grappling with the city and community he loves and its many ails: gang violence, chronic alcoholism, and economic devastation -- and how it has shaped Comptons' people, its families, and a young Kendrick maturing into adulthood.
    TPAB is Kendrick exploring his place as a black person in America, engaging in the numerous ways society has failed his people -- and often, pointing the figure directly at himself - while celebrating the richness of talent and culture brought out by the struggle.
    DAMN is Kendrick defining who he is as a spiritual being and the conflicts with the soul that comes with all things he is - black, Compton, hip-hop, famous, Kendrick -- in an epic narrative of wickedness, weakness, and redemption of the soul.

    At the start of Mother I Sober, he raps, "I'm sensitive, I feel everything, I feel everybody // One man standin' on two words, heal everybody." The Kendrick in MMBS is the Kendrick that was hardened by the devastating condition of the city he portrayed on GKMC, that was placed on a pedestal as a central figure of black America in TPAB, that mourned for the damnation of his own soul in DAMN -- finally processing everything that's happened after a lifetime of blame, guilt, trauma, expectation, ignorance, anxiety, and shame. The level of introspection shown here isn't just revealing personal details or describing a story from the past, it's examining what all that did to you.

    When I first listened to this album, I was struck by how "domestic" it is, for lack of a better word. It departs from the huge worlds he covered in his previous records - an entire city, an entire country, an entire religion - and takes us firmly into his home. His relationships with his wife, children, family, friends, and himself -- the ways he's failed them and the ways they've failed him. Kendrick ruminates on fatherhood, what it means to be a good parent, son, partner, friend, ally, cousin, and nephew, and what it means to show kindness to yourself. This is Kendrick as a man, baring his life down to the bone with extraordinary empathy and understanding of the self. It's an album only he can make, yet it feels more universal than anything he's made before.

    A masterpiece.


    YES.

  3. #143
    HE Warrior CMBYNMafia's Avatar
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    I've found a criticism with every album by Kendrick since his debut. None here. Masterpiece is deserved.

  4. #144
    Senior Member Toulouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VV View Post
    GKMC is Kendrick grappling with the city and community he loves and its many ails: gang violence, chronic alcoholism, and economic devastation -- and how it has shaped Compton's people, its families, and a young Kendrick maturing into adulthood.
    TPAB is Kendrick exploring his place as a black person in America, engaging in the numerous ways society has failed his people -- and often, pointing the finger directly at himself - while celebrating the richness of talent and culture brought out by the struggle.
    DAMN is Kendrick defining who he is as a spiritual being and the conflicts with the soul that comes with all things he is - black, Compton, hip-hop, famous, Kendrick -- in an epic narrative of wickedness, weakness, and redemption of the soul.

    At the start of Mother I Sober, he raps, "I'm sensitive, I feel everything, I feel everybody // One man standin' on two words, heal everybody." The Kendrick in MMBS is the Kendrick that was hardened by the devastating condition of the city he portrayed on GKMC, that was placed on a pedestal as a central figure of black America in TPAB, that mourned for the damnation of his own soul in DAMN -- finally processing everything that's happened after a lifetime of blame, guilt, trauma, expectation, ignorance, anxiety, and shame. The level of introspection shown here isn't just revealing personal details or describing a story from the past, it's examining what all that did to you.

    When I first listened to this album, I was struck by how "domestic" it is, for lack of a better word. It departs from the huge worlds he covered in his previous records - an entire city, an entire country, an entire religion - and takes us firmly into his home. His relationships with his wife, children, family, friends, and himself -- the ways he's failed them and the ways they've failed him. Kendrick ruminates on fatherhood, what it means to be a good parent, son, partner, friend, ally, cousin, and nephew, and what it means to show kindness to yourself. This is Kendrick as a man, baring his life down to the bone with extraordinary empathy and understanding of the self. It's an album only he can make, yet it feels more universal than anything he's made before.

    A masterpiece.
    wow, my respect to people who can express their thoughts in writing so eloquently

  5. #145
    Nothing. Not a single word. mysteryfan04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VV View Post
    GKMC is Kendrick grappling with the city and community he loves and its many ails: gang violence, chronic alcoholism, and economic devastation -- and how it has shaped Compton's people, its families, and a young Kendrick maturing into adulthood.
    TPAB is Kendrick exploring his place as a black person in America, engaging in the numerous ways society has failed his people -- and often, pointing the finger directly at himself - while celebrating the richness of talent and culture brought out by the struggle.
    DAMN is Kendrick defining who he is as a spiritual being and the conflicts with the soul that comes with all things he is - black, Compton, hip-hop, famous, Kendrick -- in an epic narrative of wickedness, weakness, and redemption of the soul.

    At the start of Mother I Sober, he raps, "I'm sensitive, I feel everything, I feel everybody // One man standin' on two words, heal everybody." The Kendrick in MMBS is the Kendrick that was hardened by the devastating condition of the city he portrayed on GKMC, that was placed on a pedestal as a central figure of black America in TPAB, that mourned for the damnation of his own soul in DAMN -- finally processing everything that's happened after a lifetime of blame, guilt, trauma, expectation, ignorance, anxiety, and shame. The level of introspection shown here isn't just revealing personal details or describing a story from the past, it's examining what all that did to you.

    When I first listened to this album, I was struck by how "domestic" it is, for lack of a better word. It departs from the huge worlds he covered in his previous records - an entire city, an entire country, an entire religion - and takes us firmly into his home. His relationships with his wife, children, family, friends, and himself -- the ways he's failed them and the ways they've failed him. Kendrick ruminates on fatherhood, what it means to be a good parent, son, partner, friend, ally, cousin, and nephew, and what it means to show kindness to yourself. This is Kendrick as a man, baring his life down to the bone with extraordinary empathy and understanding of the self. It's an album only he can make, yet it feels more universal than anything he's made before.

    A masterpiece.

  6. #146
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    The untitled unmastered erasure.
    The Holy Trinity:
    Satyajit, Sharmila, and Soumitra

  7. #147
    The People's Princess veritas's Avatar
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    Barring a masterful new studio album from Beyoncé, I think AOTY is sewn up for Kendrick with this one. The narrative—nevermind the widespread A+ level acclaim—feels far too grand to pass up.

  8. #148
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    The last hip hop artist to win AOTY was OutKast, also a double album. That one had a little bit more genre jumping into R&B, funk, and pop, and is more listener-friendly than Kendrick's, but it's certainly possible.
    The Holy Trinity:
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  9. #149
    Senior Member Sage's Avatar
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    Having listened to it several times now and having read through the discourse, gotta say…still pretty conflicted about Auntie Diaries. And that’s okay, I can be conflicted and this can still be a great album that I love a lot, and I don’t at all question Kendrick’s intentions here. But at the same time I think there’s something vaguely paternalistic and corny about the suggestion that he should just get a free pass for deadnaming because “the art” and that at the end there’s the revelatory message that we should care for our trans relatives. I suspect that overall this song’s going to have a positive impact, which I suppose I’m happy for, though the fact that this is the level that needs to be reached for a positive impact isn’t something I’m going to be super excited about quite yet. I hope this points to a near future where his support for his relatives is just support, and not a by-cishet-men-for-cishet-men song with a bunch of misgendering about working through it.

    Great album so far, tho. Love Kendrick.
    Last edited by Sage; 05-13-2022 at 11:38 PM.

  10. #150
    Administrator VV's Avatar
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    He is unmatched.


    CAN YOU MEET ME MORE THAN HALFWAY UP

  11. #151
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    This is the only thing I'm listening since Friday. A masterpiece.
    #BRAZ

  12. #152
    Nothing. Not a single word. mysteryfan04's Avatar
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    Pitchfork is a 7.6.

    Whatever.

  13. #153
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    Build up your heroes so you can tear them down, I guess.

    Critics also tend to sharpen knives for double albums anyway, it seems.
    The Holy Trinity:
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  14. #154
    Senior Member Heroesrule99's Avatar
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    I’d be fine with that score if their damn one wasn’t so high

  15. #155
    Senior Member Antwone Chigurh's Avatar
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    Pitchfork is a joke. Even got the name of a song wrong in the review.

  16. #156
    American Civil Lesbians Union DeltaEst1903's Avatar
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    I’ve only listened to disc 1 so far cuz of work, but I’m liking Mr Morale more than TPAB and especially DAMN so far.

    “We Cry Together” was fucking intense

  17. #157
    Senior Member JPN13's Avatar
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    Great album. Will ofc listen to it more, but on the spot I'd probably rank it as my least favourite of his. I think all his albums are masterpieces or near masterpieces (I put all three on my best of the decade, I believe). In any event, this has got to be in the conversation of strongest first four album runs ever.

  18. #158
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    Why do people keep acting like Untitled Unmastered doesn’t exist?
    The Holy Trinity:
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  19. #159
    Senior Member JPN13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
    Why do people keep acting like Untitled Unmastered doesn’t exist?
    Never really listened to it much when it came out (don't know why). It was released kind of like an afterthought as well if memory serves? Wasn't a lot of it the leftovers from To Pimp A Butterfly? I should go back to it in any event.

  20. #160
    Nothing. Not a single word. mysteryfan04's Avatar
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    I haven’t listened to untitled unmastered. But I guess this week would be a good time to catch up with it.

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